ACRO

Combining classical dance techniques with precision acrobatic elements, the Acro dance style is unique in its athletic blend of rhythmic gymnastics that requires extra training for our youth in both dance and acrobatic skills. Techniques that are common in Acro are handstands, cartwheels, handsprings and other tricks testing balance and focus. While these skills are not usual forms of dance, they can be incorporated into a dance routine simply by adding rhythm in time to the music, along with other dancer steps. 

Since Acro adds the need for more gymnastic technical skills, many dance schools may not teach these as it requires specially trained instructors and a lot of room. We are lucky at the Miami Dance Project to have an amazing staff fully prepared to train our dancers in the amazing Acro style, along with the space and facilities needed to properly teach our students. This makes the Miami Dance Project one of the best acro dance studios in all of Florida because of our ability to accurately teach and train acro dance.

A very important aspect of Acrobatic training is the balance, strength, and muscle control needed to perform these difficult routines. Most importantly, Acro relies heavily on discipline and focus, exactly in line with our priorities at the Miami Dance Project. During their acrobatic training, students have the chance to really grow in these different aspects that are not usual for other types of dance. This not only gives our dancers an advantage in body strength and flexibility, it also teaches them patience, care, and awareness as they continue their dance and life journeys with the Miami Dance Project community.

Another added bonus of our Acro training is the chance to test the limits of human movement both mentally and physically. Acrobatics are very challenging and sometimes not associated with dance at all, but when you add some emotional music to the mix, you get a magical dance routine that is flowing with fantasy, awe, and amazement. Because of this, Acro shows our young dancers that daily movements or actions may actually work as dance routines, whether it involves incorporating another sport’s movements or acting out a simple task like brushing your teeth in the morning. This expands their minds and limitations of what dance is and stretches it into a work of athletics, body language, flexibility, and sometimes daring feats.